Fluid Solar will bring renewable solar thermal energy and low impact living spaces to one third of the worlds population in thirty years.

 

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Big Question Workshops: Energy in South Australia

The Future Industries Institute is looking at six specific themes of research and encouraging community collaboration to develop useful projects. One of the central themes is Energy and Advanced Manufacturing looking at design and fabrication of advanced nanomaterials and nanocomposites, materials science and catalysis process development and scale up and energy capture, storage and conversion. 

The Fluid Solar presentation was different to the other presentations given on the day; the only presenter with an energy technology solution to the issue and providing an interesting insight into real-world solutions to social needs through the application of holistic energy systems. Roger spoke about Fluid Solar House, as a self-contained energy generator and consumer building, as well as, the practical ways of incorporating this into residential developments and existing infrastructure. 

Roger was joined by Professor Emily Hilder, Director of the University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute, Sam Johnson (Mayor Port Augusta City Council) and Bryan Scruby (Project Manager, 250 MW Emergency Power Plant Project, SA Government). 

A diversity of opinion regarding the energy grid, its use and regulation, was given from the different speakers and later in the group discussions. The Fluid Solar perspective is centred on creating affordable and non-centralised power generation and consumption, paired with smart technologies for individual users to successfully monitor their own consumption. This puts the accountability but also importantly, the control in the hands of the energy consumer. Other perspectives were related to changing regulations to encourage smaller infrastructure projects, methods of government, local, state and federal, effectively managing the regulations and improving South Australian access to affordable energy. 

Other perspectives were related to changing regulations to encourage smaller infrastructure projects; methods of government, local, state and federal, effectively managing the regulations; and improving South Australian access to affordable and reliable energy through grid and non-grid options. 

A big thanks to the University of South Australia for organising this workshop.